Strategic Library Article

While at ALA San Francisco #alaac15, I was approached by the publisher of Strategic Library and asked if I would be interested in writing an article for her journal! The journal is available in electronic version only and is aimed at directors and other decision makers in all types of libraries. They publish articles to help people in positions of power within libraries keep on top of current trends in the field so that they can make strategic plans which will keep their libraries relevant. She thought that having a robust manga collection was one of those things libraries need to know about to stay relevant!!! How exciting!!

Needless to say I was very excited to be asked to publish my first professional academic journal article!!!!!

They were very easy to work with and did a nice job with using my images and creating an attractive layout design of my pages. After just a few back and forth emails I had a final edit ready for publication. I was all set to go in the August 2015 edition but they decided that my article was better suited to the September edition… was fine with me because I figured it would be even more widely read!!!

So here it is… my much awaited first journal article! (pages 5-8)

SLcover image  Strategic Library

As always if you find anything here of academic use to you, please properly attribute and cite it:

Seipke, A. (2015, September 15) Manga Comes to the Library. Strategic Library, 20, 5-8. Web. http://user-94545020520.cld.bz/SL-Sept15-2.

 

Thanks All!

Presentation at ALA Annual Conference 2015

So if you have noticed an increase in blogging activity lately it is related to the fact that I was accepted as a poster session presenter at the American Libraries Association Conference this year!! As I was working on my poster, I found that I had so much to say on each of the topics I wanted to cover that I was compelled to write it all here in order to keep my poster looking visually appealing and easy to read!

I feel that the presentation went very well and I see that it generated a bunch of new traffic here too! (It is nice to see you all, my librarian friends) I was also approached and invited to submit an article to a professional journal on this subject!! : -) I will post more about that too when I get farther along.

Here is a copy of the poster which I presented so you can all see all the topics I covered. If you have any questions about how to manage the manga in your collection, how to increase your manga collection, or anything else I might be able to help with, please comment below or send me an email! If you find any errors or misconceptions in anything you hear from me please comment below or send me an email! If you have anything you would like to share with me or my readers please comment below or send me an email! If you just want me to feel like I am not talking to thin air, please comment below or send me an email!! : -)

ALA poster

To Import or Not to Import??

Which of the massive number of titles released in Japan will have a large enough following in the U.S. to make it worth the publishers’ time and money to obtain rights and translate?!

scantilation2

One way is through “Scanlation” pages.

“Scanlation” pages have arisen, often run by groups of fans, as a place to not only discuss and recommend their favorite titles but also as a way of providing access to those titles, in English, to their fellow fans. These fan driven sites allow individuals to work together scanning and translating their favorite manga so that it can be enjoyed by other people who would not be able to read it in the original Japanese. Individual issues are usually available for download for a very small fee or even for free.

These sites are beneficial for fans because:

They provide access to the newest manga, in English, for a very small fee or even for free

Fan run sites lead to a sense of community and authenticity in the reviews and suggestions

 

Instead of being persecuted for breaking copyright laws, many of these sites have developed a symbiotic relationship with both the Japanese and U.S. publishers. It helps the Japanese publishers because it increases the number of readers who can become fans of their series and it works well for the American publishers because it helps them to determine which series have the potential fan base to make it worth their efforts to translate and publish series in the U.S.

“Scanlation” pages can help publishers to determine which of the massive number of titles released in Japan they should obtain rights for and translate.

They can also be considered helpful by the manga-ka themselves as a way to get insight into the minds of their fans and see what aspects are working or not working so they can (if they want to) cater more to the desires of their fan base.

 

In order to continue the amicable relationship they have with publishers “scanlation” sites usually remove issues once a series has been licensed by an English publisher.

 

scanlation

Manga Vs. Anime

Many people confuse Anime with Manga which is understandable since they are visually very similar, both art forms are from Japan (often presented in the Japanese language even), they even often feature the same characters and titles!!

The major difference is easy to remember though…Anime is animated! It moves!

There are often other differences that can be seen too even when the same characters or even the same titles are converted from the static printed manga form into the dynamic moving anime form (which is usually the order of production, though sometimes an original anime series may be made into printed manga after the fact.)

Because Anime usually involves the efforts of a whole team of creators, there are inevitably creative compromises which take place in the story line. This can cause the plot to take very different turns from what happened to the characters in the original version (manga version) of the story. Manga on the other hand is often created by only a pair or even one lone “manga-ka”. This usually results in the creators becoming more attached to the characters because they have spent a long time and much energy creating and directing them. Manga often follows a less risky plot line because the creators (and hopefully the readers) become so much more invested in the lives of the characters in the relatively few series they read than a production team (and the TV viewers) do in one of the many shows they are involved with.

The quality of the art work is often different as well. Anime is drawn to be shown at 24 frames per second whereas manga is drawn to have each and every picture static on the page to be examined by the reader for as long as they like. While many of us see the 24 frames per second of anime as slow and the picture a bit choppier than we are used to seeing on TV, it is still going by much quicker than the images on the page in a printed manga book and can therefore be of lower quality or less detailed.

anime vs manga

http://th09.deviantart.net/fs71/PRE/f/2012/245/1/0/btooom__anime_vs_btooom__manga_by_joaocouto-d5dabny.png

Saliormoon anime vs manga

http://i.ytimg.com/vi/CUtKuT1M0D4/maxresdefault.jpg

Because there are so many frames required for each anime episode and the production schedules are often very tight in order to get them on the air quickly before the demand passes, there are often glaring errors in the frames which are simply left in rather than spending the time and effort to fix them. Other “tricks” are used by the artists drawing the anime frames to give them the desired appearance when played together but which make them look wrong when viewed alone or out of sequence. Through time this has actually become part of the quirky appeal of anime and for some viewers is considered integral to the style so that many shows are still made to look this way even though through technology they no longer need to be.

This image shows a technique used in anime called “blur” used to show fast movement.

DragonBall Z smear

http://animationsmears.tumblr.com/image/117463754189

This image shows a technique called “multiples” which is also used to show very fast movement in anime.

Lupin III multiples

http://animationsmears.tumblr.com/image/115609315867

Essential Manga: The Annotated Bibliography (onscreen)

Here is our final document all typed out. For a nicely formatted pdf document, complete with pretty pictures of the covers, please see my previous post.

Also if you are going to use any of this information please cite it properly as: aseip [Amy Seipke]. “Essential Manga: The Annotated  Bibliography (onscreen)”. Essential Manga: The Making of an Annotated Bibliography. Detroit, MI: College for Creative Studies, 1 Dec. 2014. Blog. (date you looked at this information).

Essential Manga: The Annotated  Bibliography

 Unlike Western Graphic Novels which generally follow the narrative tradition found in written literature, Manga stories are written because the authors (or Manga-ka) have a targeted audience they would like to reach and some stock characters they would like to present. In Manga, the characters are created first for a specific audience. Those characters are then used to tell stories which (the Manga-ka hopes) are of interest to the targeted audience.  Therefore, a good way to divide the broad world of Manga into manageable genres is to first determine the audience type, then establish the theme of the stories or the special characteristics of the protagonists.

Because of this focus on the intended audience, the most common launching platform for manga stories is in periodicals intended for specific audiences. The bibliography which follows will highlight some of the leading magazines aimed at each type of audience as well as give examples of some of the more popular stories which have gained enough of a following to take on a life of their own and be published as stand-alone (often serialized) works called “tankobon”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supported by a Carnegie-Whitney Grant from the American Library Association.

Table of Contents

 

Academic Studies of Manga …….……………………………………………          4                                                                                                                                                                                           

Children’s Manga………………………………………………………………..         5

Magazines …………………………………………………..……………….               5

                Serialized Stories ……………………………………………….….          6

 

Boys’ Manga (Shonen or Shounen) ..……………………………..……..            8

                Magazines ……………………………………………………………         8

Mecha (Robots) …………………………………………………………………       10          

                Haremumono (Harem) ……………………………………….…..        12

                Ecchi (Naughty) ……………………………………………………..       14

                Komono (Animals) ………………………………………………….       15

                Kaito or kaitou (Gentleman Thief) …………….………………..        16

                Martial Arts …………………………………………….……………..     17

                Science Fiction ………………………………………………………..      18

                Fantasy and Adventure ………………………….………………….      20

                Supernatural …………………………………………………………..      22

                Sports …………………………………………………………..……….     23

                Ryori Manga (Food) ……………………………….……………….        25

 

Girls’ Manga (Shojo) ………..………………….……………………………….     26

Magazines …………………………………..………………………….    26

Mahou shoujo (Magical Girl) …………….…………………………     28

Gyakuharemu (Reverse Harem) …………………………………….     29

Romance ………………………………………………………………….   31

Komono ……………………………………….………………………….    32

Kaito or kaitou (Gentleman thief)  …………..……………………..       33

Science Fiction …………………………………….………..…………….    34

Supernatural …………………………..…………….…………………….    35

Sports ………………………………………………….…………………….   36

Ryori Manga (Food) ………………….…………….…………………….    37

 

Adult Manga (Seijin) ………………………………………………………………    38

                Hentai ……………………………………………………………………..  38

 

Men’s Manga (Seinen) ……………………………………………………………..   40

                Magazines …………………………………………………………….……  40

                Sararimman (Salary Man) ……………………………………………..    42

                Haremumono (Harem) …………………………….………………….    43

                Bara ……………………………………………….……..…………………  44

                Kaito or kaitou (Gentleman thief) ……..……………………………     45

Martial Arts Manga (Ansatsuklen) ………………………………….     46

Science Fiction     ……………………………………………..…………    47

Supernatural     ……….…………………………………………………..    48

Sports   ………………….………………………………………………….    49

Ryori Manga (Food)    …..……………………………………………….     50

Historical Fiction ………….………………………………………………    52

Parenting ……………………….……………………………….……………. 53

 

Women’s Manga (Josei) …………………………..………………………………..    54

                Magazines …………………………………….…………………..………..   54

Kyariauman (Career Woman) and OL (Office Lady) ……………..       55

Gyakuharemu (Reverse Harem) ……………………………………….     56

Romance ………………………………………………………….…………    57

Yaoi ……………………………………………..……………………………    58

Yuri ……………………………………………………………………………    59

Science Fiction ………………………………………………..……………      60

Supernatural …………………………..…………….………………………     61

Mystery, Horror, Suspense ……………………………………..…………      62

Sports ……………………………………………………………………………    63

Ryori Manga (Food) ………………………………………………………….     64

Historical Fiction …………………………………….………………………..     65

Parenting ………………………………………………….…………………….    66

 

Truth-Based Manga ………………………………………………………………………    67

 


 

Academic Studies of Manga

This is a sample of some of the scholarly books, essays, and papers written about the psychology, sociology, history or literature of the Manga phenomenon.

Aoyama, Tomoko and Barbara Hartley, eds. Girl Reading Girl in Japan. New York: Routledge, 2010. Print.

Galbraith, Patrick W. The Otaku Encyclopedia. New York: Kodansha International, 2009. Print.

Gravett, Paul. Manga: Sixty Years of Japanese Comics. New York: Harper Collins, 2004. Print.

Lehmann, Timothy R. Manga Masters of the Art. New York: Harper Collins, 2005. Print.

Okabayashi, Kensuke. Manga for Dummies. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley Publishing, 2007. Print.

Prough, Jennifer S. Straight from the Heart: Gender, Intimacy, and the Cultural Production of Shojo Manga. Honalulu: University of Hawai’I Press, 2011. Print.

Silverman, Laura, ed. Bringing Home the Sushi: An Inside Look at Japanese Business Through Japanese Comics. Tokyo: Mangajin, 1995. Print.

Return to Table of Contents

Children

Kodomomuke – (children’s manga) These stories are written specifically for children of either gender. Often they contain a moral in an effort to teach a lesson similar to Aesop’s Fables.

Magazines – Magazines are common launching platforms for new manga stories. These are the most popular Kodomo magazines intended to bring new stories to an audience of young children. These magazines are often used as marketing tools for toys, to provide tie-ins with anime series, or to promote entire multimedia franchises.

Comic BomBom. Tokyo: Kodansha, 1981-2007. Monthly. Print.

This magazine had young elementary school boys as its target audience, until it ending publication in 2007. It included lots of tie-ins with games and toys especially the “Gundam” franchise and similar styled stories.

CoroCoro Comic. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 1977-Present. Monthly. Print.

The original home of both “Doraemon” and “Pokemon”, this magazine is targeted primarily at boys younger than those who would read shonen manga magazines.

Serialized Stories

Fujiko, Fujio. Doraemon. Tokyo: Shoogakkan, 1974. Print.

Doraemon is a robot cat sent back in time to help Nobita Nobi to lead a more successful life. He is a cultural icon in Japan recognized by generations of children as his stories were run in numerous children’s magazines from 1969 through 1996.

Konishi, Noriyuki. Yo-Kai Watch. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 2012-present. Print.

In this Manga, the protagonist is a young boy (though in the videogame version it is a girl) who is able to see supernatural beings. He uses this power to help people who are being bothered by malicious beings. He also befriends helpful supernatural beings whom he can later call on for help.

Maekawa, Ryo. Animal Yokocho. Tokyo: Shueisha, 2000-present. Print.

The main character of this series is Ami Matsuzaki, a preschool aged girl who has a door in her room which leads to another world. Her three main visitors are living versions of a stuffed panda, a teddy bear, and a toy rabbit.

Nomura, Shinbo. Tsurupika Hagemaru. Tokyo: Shogakujan, 1985-1995. Print.

Hagemaru Hageda is the main character of this story. The stories often involve his adventures at school, with his teacher and his classmates. Many of the stories revolve around the fact that his parents are very frugal and will do outlandish things in order to save money.

Yabuno, Tenya. Inazuma Eleven. Tokyo: Shogakujan, 2008-2011. Print.

Mamoru Endou, who is the main character, is a hard-working boy who works with his natural talent to become a great soccer player. He always puts the needs of others above his own and inspires the best from his teammates and friends. He also has great respect for his elders, especially his grandfather who was a legendary soccer player and died before he was born.

Yanase, Takashi. Anpanman. Tokyo: Fureberukan, 1973-2013. Print.

Anpanman is a helpful character who spends his days protecting the city where he lives. He is a pastry filled with bean paste which came to life when a shooting star landed in the oven in which he was being baked. He has many sidekicks and friends who help him in his endeavors and the series has earned the record for having the most characters in an animated franchise. One notable feature of these stories is that when Anpanman finds someone who is hungry he feeds them with pieces of his head. The baker Uncle Jam then replaces his whole head for him when needed.

Return to Table of Contents


 

Boys

Shonen (or shounen) manga – boys’ manga – stories written for an audience of young boys. The usual targeted age of this audience is 14-21.

Magazines – Magazines are common launching platforms for new Manga stories. The following are all shonen magazines intended to bring new stories to an audience of boys. These magazines are often used as marketing tools for toys, to provide tie-ins with anime series, or to promote entire multimedia franchises.

Comic Earth Star. Tokyo: Earth Star Entertainment, 2011-present. Print.

This magazine has announced plans to go to a digital-only format.
Heishi, Yoshihisa, ed. Weekly Shonen Jump. Tokyo: Shueisha, 1969-present. Periodical. Print.

Part of a whole line of magazines with the word “Jump” in the title by Shueisha, this is the top selling Shueisha magazine and one of the top overall.

Monthly Shonen Gangan. Tokyo: Enix, 1991-present. Print.

This magazine is published monthly and has been and continues to be the launching point for a large number of shonen manga series.

 Shonen Ace. Tokyo: Kadokawa Shoten, 1994-Present. Print.

Specializes in a smaller market with anime tie-ins and Ecchi stories versus the more common action stories.

Weekly Shonen Champion. Tokyo: Akita Shoten, 1969-present. Print.

This weekly boys’ magazine, begun in 1969, has been home to many popular manga series including “Iron Wok Jan” and “Squid Girl.”

Weekly Shonen Magazine. Tokyo: Kodansha, 1959-present. Print.

Targeted to boys in the older range of this audience, Weekly Shonen Magazine is most popular with late high school and early college age boys. In 2013, it had a circulation of over 1.3 million readers.

Weekly Shonen Sunday. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 1959-present. Print.

The home of “Detective Conan”, this boys’ magazine has been in print since 1959 and is actually released on Wednesdays (despite its title).

Mecha – Robot manga is one of the more popular types of Manga for boys, where it often develops into anime series and television shows. Many mecha manga series are part of entire franchises owned by multi-media companies which include anime series, movies, video games, model kits, and other toys or collectables. Some of these characters are even immortalized as statues in cities around the world.

Kataoka, Jinsei and Kazuma Kondou. Eureka Seven. Cypress, CA: Bandai Entertainment, 2005-2006. Print.

Renton Thurston thinks his life is boring, working for his grandfather and living always under the shadow of his heroic father. When a beautiful girl named Eureka falls from the sky and needs his help, life gets more interesting.

Nagai, Go. Mazinger Z. Tokyo: Shueisha, 1972-1974. Print.

This story is an early example of robots which could be controlled from inside instead of being remotely controlled. It has been adapted to an animated series and also translated into both English and Spanish.

Sadamoto, Yoshiyuki. Neon Genesis Evangelion. San Francisco: Viz, 1994-2013. Print.

This is the first manga available from Viz in a non-flipped format (meaning that it is read left-to-right as it would be in the original Japanese version). It is now available in digital editions.

Tezuka, Osamu, Astro Boy. Milwaukie, OR: Dark Horse, 1952-1968. Print.

Written by one of the most famous and prolific Manga-ka in the world, Astro Boy is considered by many to be the beginning of the modern manga movement.

Tomino, Yoshiyuki. Mobile Suit Gundam. Illus. Yoshikazu Yasuhiko. Tokyo: Akita Shoten, 1979. Print.

One of the first series to feature “mobile suits” style of mecha, which were humanoid shaped machines operated from inside a cockpit.

Ueyama, Michiro. Zoids. San Francisco: Viz, 2002. Print.

Zoids are the living machines used as weaponry in a war. The manga is written as a way of explaining the back story behind a very popular line of toys.

Yokoyama, Mitsuteru. Tetsujin 28-go. Tokyo: Kobunsha, 1956-1966. Print.

This was one of the first Manga stories to feature a giant robot. It has been very popular over the years and has been turned into an animated TV series, as well as a few movies, a video game and was even used as the basis for a new manga series that was started in 2013.

Haremumono – “Harem manga” does not necessarily refer to sexual relationships between characters (though it can), it simply means that the main character (a male) is surrounded by numerous female characters who occupy a subordinate role. As a subgenre of shonen, these are usually manifested as your typical (and sometimes not so typical) “love triangle” stories.

Akamatsu, Ken. Love Hina. New York: Kodanshs, 1998-2001. Print.

As a child, Keitaro Urashima has made a promise to enter Tokyo University and

be reunited with his sweetheart. However, now that he is of age to do so, he has

forgotten her name! This story follows him as he tries to run his grandmother’s

apartment building and gain admittance to the University all while attempting to

find the right girl.

Hasemi, Saki. To Love Ru. Illus. Kentaro Yabuki. Tokyo: Shueisha, 2006-2009. Print.

In addition to being a shonen harem manga this story also contains elements of

science fiction as it features a teleporting run away princess. Lala is a princess

from another planet and does not wish to marry any of the men her father has

picked for her. Rito Yuki is a boy who is too shy to confess his feelings to his

crush. When they meet and Lala falls for Rito, he learns he must protect her from

her suitors or her father will destroy the Earth.

Hosana, Tanaka. Ninja Girls. New York: Kodansha, 2006-2009. Print.

Raizou Katana is an outcast because of the horn on his head. After saving the life of a female ninja he learns that he is the heir to a clan. With the help of a whole group of female ninjas he tries to rebuild his clan and return them to their former glory. First step however, is finding a princess to marry, which proves to be very challenging indeed.

Ikeda, Akihisa. Rosario + Vampire. San Franciso, CA: Viz, 2004-2007. Print.

Tsukune Aono enrolls in a private school only to find out it is a school for monsters. He decides to stay and attend school there anyway after befriending a vampire named Moka Akashiya.

Masakazu, Katsura. I”s. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2005-2007. Print.

Ichitaka Seto is a high school student who can’t ever seem to tell the girl of his

dreams how he feels about her. Things get complicated when his childhood friend shows back up and has feelings for Ichitaka also.

Ecchi – naughty works with sexual undertones is a description which can be applied to works of manga in any category, including those targeted at younger audiences. As a subgenre of shonen these stories could  almost considered romance stories. What makes them different than a normal romance story is that they feature quite a bit of “fan service”, which means showing a character in a more provocative way than is necessary for the plot. There is a lot of overlap with haremumono manga.

Ishibumi, Ichiei. High School DxD. Illus. Miyama-Zero and Hiroji Mishima. New York: Yen Press, 2010- present. Print.

Issei Hyodo is killed on his first date after being asked out by a girl who turns out

to be a fallen angel. Lucky for him, he is brought back to life; unlucky for him, he

finds out his savior is actually a devil and now she has become his master.

Kawashita, Mizuki. Strawberry 100%. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2007-2010. Print.

Junpei Manaka wants to be a film- director, his friend Aya Toujou wants to be a

Writer, so they team up to create films during their high school years. The title

comes from an episode where on his first day of school Junpei has seen a girl in

strawberry print underwear up on the roof of the school. He searches for this

mystery girl throughout his time at the school.

Oshimi, Shuzo. Flowers of Evil. New York: Vertical, 2009-2014. Print.

On a sudden impulse, Takao Kasuga steals the gym clothes of his crush while she isn’t looking. Unfortunately, his actions did not go unnoticed and another strange and lonely girl blackmails him into pretending to be her friend.

Tezuka, Osamu. Apollo’s Song. New York: Vertical, 1970. Print.

This is Tezuka’s exploration of the history of love and romance. The main

character, Shogo, is unloved by his mother and grows up unable to understand

love until he is given electroshock therapy and sees the goddess Athena. Athena

sets him on a path where he will explore love and sex until he can understand

what love really is.

Kemono – Stories which feature anthropomorphic animals. Again, this term can be applied to works of manga in many different categories. The list below contains only stories in which the main character is an anthropomorphized animal, though many other manga have supporting characters who are animals acting in human ways.

Anbe, Masahiro. Squid Girl. Tokyo: Akita Shoten, 2007-present. Print.

Squid girl comes out of the ocean to get revenge on humans for polluting the

oceans.

Igarashi, Mikio. Ninpen Manmaru. Toyko: Enix, 1995-1999. Print.

This story follows a ninja penguin as he fights against other local martial artists.

Sonic the Hedgehog. Mamaroneck, NY: Archie Comics, 1992- Present. Print.

Sonic uses his powers of super speed and super strength to protect the planet and those he loves.

Minoru, Murao. World Destruction: Futari no Tenshi. Tokyo: ASCII Media Works, 2008- present. Print.

This story takes place in a world in which humans have been enslaved by animal

rulers. Kyrie is a human who works with others in an effort to destroy their

world.

Yokouchi, Naoki. Cyborg Kuro-Chan. Tokyo: Kodansha, 1997-2002. Print.

Kuro is a cat who is kidnapped and turned into a cyborg with super powers which he uses to protect the city and the old couple who are his owners.

Kaito (or kaitou) – Gentleman thief. These stories feature a protagonist who behaves contrary to normal protagonists. A “gentleman thief” is usually one who uses his thievery as a means to right a wrong, a Robin Hood- type character. At the very least a gentleman thief ensures that innocent people will not be hurt in his quest to fulfill his own needs.

 

Aoyama, Gosho. Case Closed. 84 Vol. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 1994. Print.

While technically a detective story about super sleuth Jimmy Kudo who gets poisoned and turned into a small boy, many of the characters from Aoyama’s Magic Kaito series make appearances in these stories and in an episode in the anime Jimmy fights against the famous gentleman thief Lupin III.

—. Majikku Kaito. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 1987-present. Print.

Kaito Kuroba discovers that his father was a famous thief named the Kaito Kid. He was killed by his competition while on a mission to find a gem that can bestow immortality. Kaito takes over in his dad’s shoes determined to not let his killers gain immortality for themselves.

Takahashi, Hideyasu. Kaitou Joker. Tokyo: Shogakukan,2008. Print.

A thief named Joker uses magic tricks to steal treasures. This story has not yet been officially released in English.

Martial Arts Manga Ansatsuken – literally “assassination fist” or Satsujinken “murder fist” are words used in Japanese to indicate a form of martial arts which is developed in order to kill an opponent. The stories in this section are ones which feature the use of martial arts as a main plot point often with the goal of killing or eliminating the “bad guys” completely. Often these stories have been comically exaggerated aspects to keep them from becoming too dark.

Hara, Tetsuro and Buronson. Fist of the North Star. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 1995. Print.

After much of the world’s population is killed off, the few people who remain have resorted to martial law. This story follows Kenshiro as he fights for his own survival and the survival of those he loves.

Maekawa, Takeshi. Ironfist Chinmi. London, UK: Bloomsbury, 1983-1997. Print.

Written by Takeshi Maekawa, this Manga is centered on the story of a boy called Chinmi who learns Kung Fu through the staple manga method of fighting progressively more challenging foes.

Nakahira, Masahiko. Street Fighter: Sakura Ganbaru! Richmond Hill, ONT: Udon/Capcon, 2007. Print.

This Manga follows the story of Sakura Ganbaru and her quest to become a street-fighting girl.

Kishimoto, Mashashi. Naruto. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2003-present. Print.

Started in the Aug 1997 issue of Akamaru Jump – one of the best-selling manga series of all time.

Takahashi, Rumiko. Ranma ½. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2003 – present. Print.

Ranma ½ is the hilarious story of Ranma Saotome, whose martial arts father takes him to a martial arts training academy at an early age.  There, they fall into the spring and when doused with water, become whatever had been drowned there before.  Ranma’s father turns into a giant panda and Ranma turns into a delicate, red-haired girl.  Hilarious adventures ensue.

   

 Science-Fiction or Sci-Fi manga includes stories which seem just beyond the reach of current possibilities. They usually take place off Earth, in a parallel universe, or a time far distant from ours. Unlike fantasy or adventure stories, Sci-Fi stories mostly follow the rules of the real world, as they are used as a way to explore what may be.

Arakawa, Hiromu. Full Metal Alchemist. 27 Vol. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2001-2010. Print.

The world of Fullmetal Alchemist is set in a fictional universe in which alchemy is one of the most advanced scientific techniques. The story follows the Elric brothers who are searching for a philosopher’s stone to restore their bodies after a failed attempt to bring their mother back to life using alchemy.

Matsumoto, Leiji. Cosmoship Yamato. Tokyo: Akita Shoten, 174-1975. Print.

In this Manga, the inhabitants of Earth secretly build a massive spaceship inside the ruins of the gigantic Japanese battleship Yamato which lies exposed at the former bottom of the ocean location where she was sunk in World War II. This becomes the Space Battleship Yamato for which the story is titled. Enormously powerful, it can vaporize a fleet of enemy ships with one shot; however, it takes a brief but critical period to charge before firing.

Michihara, Katsumi. Legend of the Galactic Heroes: Golden Wings. Tokyo: Tokuma Shoten, 1986. Print.

In humanity’s distant future, two interstellar states – the monarchic Galactic Empire and the democratic Free Planets Alliance – are embroiled in a never-ending war. The story focuses on the exploits of rivals as they rise to power and fame in the Galactic Empire and the Free Planets Alliance.

Sorachi, Hideaki. Gin Tama. San Francisco: Viz, 2003- Present. Print.

Set in the Edo period which has been conquered by aliens named Amanto, the plot follows life from the point of view of Samurai Gintoki Sakata, who works as a freelancer alongside his friends in order to pay the monthly rent.

Takemiya, Keiko. Terra e… . New York: Vertical, 1977-1980. Print.

The series spans a large number of years, jumping back and forth multiple times, from Jomy’s life on Ataraxia, to the various events on Station E-1077, to Jomy’s founding of a Mu colony on a habitable planet, to the Superior Dominance war of extermination on the Mu, and finally from the Mu to return to Terra.

 

Fantasy stories are ones which take place in a world utterly different from this one. Adventure stories are those in which the characters get to have experiences outside the normal course of life. Both of these kinds of stories provide an escape from daily life and allow the imagination to run wild.

Oda, Eiichiro. One Piece. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 1997-present. Print.

One Piece has received wide critical acclaim, primarily for its art, characterization, humor and story. Several volumes of the manga have broken publishing records, including highest initial print run of any book in Japan and the first book to sell over three million copies in Oricon history. As of 2013, the series had over 345 million volumes in circulation worldwide, making it the best selling manga series in history.

Ono, Toshihiro. Pokemon: The Electric Tale of Pikachu. San Francisco: Viz Media, 1997-1999. Print

One of the most popular manga series of all time, Pokemon is serialized in print and television.  When something begins gnawing on the wiring in his house, ten-year-old Ash Ketchum discovers his first Pokemon: Pikachu. Ash sets out to become the world’s greatest Pokemon trainer, and to do so, he and Pikachu must brave a series of adventures

Hayashiya, Shizuru. Onegai Teacher. Fremont, CA: ComicsOne, 2002-2003. Print.

A story mainly revolving around a tight-knit group of friends in high school and how they cope with several life-changing events that are never too far off from intimate relationships. The main character is a boy named Kei Kusanagi who suffers from a very rare disease which causes a comatose state referred to as a “standstill” whenever he is under severe emotional distress.

Mashima, Hiro. Fairy Tail.   New York: Del Ray, 2006-present. Print.

A group of magicians who are gathered into a guild called Fairy Tail are the pre-eminent magic guild, and the one guild that Celestial Magician and cute girl Lucy wishes to join.

Toriyama, Akira. Dragonball. 42 Vol. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 1984-1995. Print.

Dragon Ball was initially inspired by the classical Chinese novel  Journey to the West . The series follows the adventures of the protagonist, Goku,  from his childhood through adulthood as he trains in martial arts and explores the world in search of the seven orbs known as the Dragon Balls, which summon a wish-granting dragon when gathered. Along his journey, Goku makes several friends and battles a wide variety of villains, many of whom also seek the Dragon Balls.

  

 Supernatural – These stories are ones which are usually set in the world we inhabit with only some minor additions. Characters in this genre include magical beings or occult entities, those creatures which are not generally thought of as “real.”

Kubo, Tite, Lance Caselman, et al. Bleach. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2004- present. Print.

Bleach follows the adventures of Ichigo Kurosaki after he obtains the powers of a Soul Reaper – a death personification similar to the Grim Reaper—from another Soul Reaper. His newfound powers force him to take on the duties of defending humans from evil spirits and guiding departed souls to the afterlife, and set him on journeys to various ghostly realms of existence.

Otaka, Shinobu. Magi. San Franciso: Viz, 2013-present. Print.

A fantasy adventure inspired by A Thousand and One Nights. Deep within the desert lie the mysterious Dungeons, vast stores of riches there for the taking by anyone lucky enough to find them and brave enough to venture into the depths from where few have ever returned. Young adventurer Aladdin means to find the Dungeons and their riches, but Aladdin is just as mysterious as the treasures he seeks. Together with his friend, Ali Baba and the genie, Ugo, Aladdin sets out to find his fortune in the depths of the endless dunes…

Hiroshi, Shiibashi. Illegal Rare. Tokyo: Shueisha, 2014-present. Print.

Supernatural creatures live alongside humans, but these “rares” are being hunted to extinction over time. An organization is being formed to protect these rares, and allow them to live their lives as they like. The starting members of this organization are few; there’s the masked Fukumen, the Black Vampyr king AxL, and they are soon joined by the sweet-voiced mermaid Mirror. Together, their quest is to protect the rares from the deadly hunters.

Takaya, Kagami. Seraph of the End. Illus. Yamamoto Yamato. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2012-present. Print.

After trumpets of the apocalypse proclaim the fall of humanity, vampires arise from the shadows to rule the earth. Yuichiro wants just one thing—to get revenge by killing each and every vampire.

Sports manga are very popular in Japan as well as in the U.S. These stories center around a sports team or a particular person who is very heavily involved in a sport. Many of these could also be considered “slice-of-life” stories in which people are just living their normal lives but their normal lives include a great deal of focus on sports. There are sports manga for just about any sport one could imagine, including less physical ones such as chess, or mahjong. These are some which are currently the most popular and widely read.

Higuchi, Daisuke, Naomi Kokubo, et al. Whistle. 24 Vol. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 1998-2003. Print.

Everybody has a dream, and for Sho Kazamatsuri, that dream is simple: he wants to be the best football player he can possibly be. Pressured by numerous challenges, the teenager must work twice as hard to make his dreams come true. He wants to play football so badly he’s willing to hustle day and night to make it happen. Packed with action, humour and teenage kicks, Whistle! is a must-read for dreamers (and football fans) of all ages.

Mori, Eto and Masahiro Ikeno. Dive!! . Tokyo: Shogakukan, 2007-2008. Print.

The story centers on the Mizuki Diving Club (MDC) member Tomoki Sakai. The MDC has fallen on hard times, and their sponsors are preparing to pull their support. They promise to give the club another year of support if the new coach, Kayoko Asaki, can get one of the members into the Olympics in a year’s time.

Adachi, Mitsuru. Rough. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 1987-1989. Print.

In this romantic swimming manga, a high school student Keisuke Yamato, a 100 m freestyle swimmer, and Ami Ninomiya, the diver he falls in love with.   Their families own rival confectionery stores, and Ami hates Keisuke’s family because she believes her grandfather was driven to an early death because of the Yamato “horned owl” manju, which outsold her family’s owl manju.

Kajiwara, Ikki. Star of the Giants. 19 Vol. Tokyo: Kodansha, 1966-1971. Print.

The story is about Hyuuma Hoshi, a promising young baseball pitcher who dreams of becoming a top star like his father Ittetsu Hoshi in the professional Japanese league. Hyuuma joins the popular Giants team, and soon realizes the difficulty of managing the high expectations.

    

Ryori Manga is manga about food. Food is a very important part of life and, as these stories attest, it can sometimes also be the focus of a person’s attention. Some food manga focuses on the chef, some on the recipes and some on the experience of eating.

Terasawa, Daisuke. Mister Ajikko. 19 Vol. Tokyo: Kodansha, 1986-1989. Print.

This manga is about a young boy cook.   One of the earliest cooking/battle related manga and anime of its kind, there are some indications that this series is the inspiration for the live action competitive cooking show, Iron Chef.

Saijyo, Shinji. Iron Wok Jan! . 27 Vol. Fremont, CA: ComicsOne, 1995-2000. Print.

Jan is a talented young chef at a top class restaurant in Tokyo called Gottancho. Jan is really arrogant and full of self-confidence regarding his cooking technique. He always challenges Kiriko — a talented chef of Gottancho. In the first episode, both Jan and Kiriko have entered a cooking competition to see who is the best chef.

Hashiguchi, Takahi. Yakitate!! Ja-pan. 26 Vol. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2002-2007. Print.

The stakes are high and the competition is fierce, but Kazuma won’t let anything prevent him from achieving his nation-changing, freshly baked goal. Relocating to Tokyo, Kazuma seeks to further his studies at Pantasia, a famous bakery chain. He must rise to the challenge and pass the entrance examination, or his best intentions will fall flat.

Asaura. Ben-To Zero: Road to Witch. Illus. Kaito Shibano. Tokyo: Shueisha, 2011. Print.

Prequel to the light novel and anime series written and drawn by the illustrator of the light novels. It follows Sen Yarizui’s road to becoming the Ice Witch.

Shimabukuro, Mitsutoshi. Toriko. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2008 – present. Print.

This Manga follows the adventures of Toriko, a Gourmet Hunter, as he searches for rare, diverse foods to complete a full-course meal. On his journey, he is accompanied by a timid chef who wants to improve his skills.

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Girls

Shojo (or shoujo) – girls’ manga – stories written for an audience of young girls. The specific ages targeted by these publications are from around 14-21.

 

Magazines – Magazines are common launching platforms for new Manga stories. These are some of the most popular shojo magazines intended to bring new stories to an audience of young girls. These magazines are often used as marketing tools for toys, to provide tie-ins with anime series, or to promote entire multimedia franchises.

Betsucomi. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 1970-Present. Print.

One of the magazines published by Shogakukan for the shojo market, Betsucomi had a circulation over 90,000 in 2009.

Ciao. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 1977-Present. Print.

This magazine is aimed at the younger end of the shojo market and always includes a “prize” of some kind.

Hana to Yume. Tokyo: Hakusensha, 1974-Present. Print.

The majority of readers of this magazine are also in the younger age bracket for shojo manga, between 13-18 years old. It is published twice a month and releases its stories in tankobons with the “Hana to Yuma Comics” imprint.

Ichikawa, Ikushu, ed. LaLa. Tokyo: Hakusensha, 1976-Present. Print.

This is one of the most popular shojo manga magazines with a circulation over 170,000 in 2008.

 

Margaret. Tokyo: Shueisha, 1963-Present. Print.

Along with the series published in its sister magazine, Bessatsu Margaret, the tankobons collecting stories from Margaret are all published by Shueisha under the Margaret Comics imprint.

 

Nakayoshi. Tokyo: Kodansha, 1955-Present. Print.

With a title that means “Good Friend” this magazine has traditionally focused on stories involving first love but is recently showing an effort to switch focus to fantasy stories.

 

Princess. Tokyo: Akita Shoten, 1974-Present. Print.

After beginning in 1974, this magazine spawned an offshoot called Princess Gold in 1979. Both Princess and Princess Gold are aimed at a teenaged audience right in the middle of the shojo group.

           

Ribon. Tokyo: Shueisha, 1955-Present. Print.

This magazine was the original home to many popular stories, including the kaito/magical girl series Kamikaze Kaitou Jeanne.

Shojo Comic. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 1968-Present. Print.

In the 50+ years it has been in publication, this magazine has tried several different release schedules being release weekly, semi-monthly, or monthly through its lifetime, it is currently being released semi-monthly.

Wings. Tokyo: Shinshokan, 1982-Present. Print.

This magazine is aimed at those in the upper part of the age range which is considered to be in the shojo audience and focuses on action and fantasy story lines.

  

 

Mahou Shoujo – “magical girl” – features young girls who use magic. The characters in these stories are magical and that often proves a very important plot point in the stories.

Komiyuno, Shiho. Powerpuff Girls Z. 2 Vol. Tokyo: Shueisha, 2006-2007. Print.

A chemical used to stop an ecological disaster also succeeds in giving super powers to three ordinary girls. The girls must then use their super powers to protect Tokyo from rampant evil.

Takeuchi, Naoko. Sailor Moon. 18 Vol. New York: Kodansha Comics USA, 1991-1997. Print.

Usagi Tsukino transforms into Sailor Moon in order to search for a princess and an artifact called the “Legendary Silver Crystal.” With the help of the Sailor Soldiers, she battles against villains to prevent the theft of the Silver Crystal and the destruction of the solar system.

Tezuka, Osamu. Princess Knight. Tokyo: Kodansha, 1953-1956. Print.

This manga follows the adventures of Princess Sapphire, a girl who pretends to be a male prince to prevent the criminal Duke Duralumon from inheriting the throne of the reign of Silverland.

Yoshida, Reiko. Tokyo Mew Mew. 7 Vol. Los Angeles: Tokyopop, 2000-2003. Print.

Five girls, with special powers given to them from the animal DNA they have been infused with, are led by Ichigo Momomiya as they seek to protect the earth from aliens who think it is theirs to “reclaim.”

  

 

Gyakuharemu – “reverse harem” – This does not necessarily mean that these stories refer to sexual relationships between characters (though it can, in which case it would be a subgenre of josei seijin), simply that the main female character is surrounded by numerous male characters who occupy a subordinate role. Within the shojo category many of these stories can also be considered “ecchi” which refers to works that have a slightly naughty or sexual undertone.

Ayane, Ukyou. S.P.Y. (Swim Paradise e Youkoso!). Tokyo: Margaret Comics, 2007. Print.

Nagi comes to the city in search of her mother. When she joins the swim club at her new school and finds that the pool has been entirely taken over by boys, things get interesting.

Junko. Watashi ga Motete Dousunda. Tokyo: Kodansha, 2011. Print.

Serinuma Kae is in her second-year of high school and is a fujoshi (a major fan of the BL genre). The death of her favorite anime character causes her to become stressed and start to lose weight rapidly, which complicates matters greatly.

Kou, Matsuzuki. Shiawase Kissa Sanchoume. 15 Vol. Los Angeles, CA: Tokyopop, 2005-2009. Print.

Sixteen year old Takamura Uru is a naive and cheerful girl who is often mistaken as an elementary school student because of her short height. After her mother gets remarried, she moves out on her own and takes a part-time job at a café where her very bizarre coworkers quickly become an important part of her life.

Takaya, Natsuki. Fruits Basket. 23 Vol. Los Angeles, CA: TokyoPop, 1998-2006. Print.

When high school student Tohru Honda’s finds herself with nowhere else to go, she begins living in a tent on her own. That is, until she finds a home with her popular classmate Yuki Sohma and his cousins Shigure and Kyo. The Sohmas live with a curse that causes them to turn into their Chinese zodiac animal when stressed.  Tohru’s presence has a profound effect on the Sohma’s.

Ukyo, Ayane. Desire Climax. 7 Vol. Tokyo: Shueisha, 2004-2006. Print.

One night, when going home after work, Mio encounters upon a violent young man who throws money at her, saying he’ll ‘buy her’, after stealing her first kiss. Events become complicated quickly between Mio’s brother, Mio and the young man.

Romance – One of the more prolific genres for girls of all ages is the romance story. Some manga romance stories, even those for the shojo or shounen audience, are a bit intense, sexual, and risqué; the term for this is “Ecchi”.

Hato, Moa. Hatoful Boyfriend: A School of Hope and White Wings. MIST(PSI) Press, 2011. Digital Interactive Text Visual Novel. Windows Platform.

This interactive novel is told through a variety of choices the reader (or player) makes. After reading the on screen content, the reader picks which of several choices they think the character should take. These choices lead to other choices and allows for various plot twists, events, and outcomes for the characters.

Ikeyamada, Go. Suki Desu Suzuki-kun!!. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 2008-2012. Print.

This story follows four friends through their middle school and high school years as they all sort out their feelings for one another.

Ikeda, Riyoko. The rose of Versailles. 10 Vol. Tokyo: Sanyusha, 1972-1973. Print.

This is one of the most well-known stories in shojo romance. It contains elements of yuri as well as historical fiction since it involves romantic feelings between a cross-dressing girl disguised as a man and a young woman. It uses Marie Antoinette and Axel von Fersen as characters and Versailles as its setting.

Yabuchi, Yu. Naisho no Tsubomi. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 2005-Present. Print.

With each volume focusing on a different girl, all with the same given name, this manga explores the scary time that is adolescence by walking through various episodes of the transition to adulthood with each girl.

 

Kemono – Stories which feature anthropomorphic animals. Again, this term can be applied to works of manga in many different categories. The list below contains only stories in which the main character is an anthropomorphized animal, though many other manga have supporting characters who are animals acting in human ways.

Murayama, Kei. Centaur no Nayami. Los Angeles, CA: Seven Seas Entertainment. 2011-Present. Print.

The title of this manga translates to “Centaur’s Worries.” In a world where centaurs, angels, and mermaids are the norm, a centaur named Himeno Kimihara lives a normal life facing the same obstacles and worries as regular human girls do.

Tezuka, Osamu. Unico. Tokyo: Sanrio, 1976-1979. Print.

Unico is a little unicorn who has the ability to make anyone happy. In order to protect him from the jealous gods, the West Wind has to wisk him away sometimes very unexpectedly.

Tatsuyama, Sayuri. Puku Puku Tennen Kairanban. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 1999-2005. Print.

This story follows the daily life of a puppy named Puku and his friends. It is currently only published in Japanese.

Kaito (or kaitou) – Gentleman thief. These stories feature a protagonist who behaves contrary to normal protagonists. A “gentleman thief” is usually one who uses his thievery as a means to right a wrong, a Robin Hood type character. At the very least a gentleman thief ensures that innocent people will not be hurt in his quest to fulfill his own needs.

Tachikawa, Megumi. Saint Tail. Los Angeles, CA: TokyoPop, 1995-1996. Print.

In her real life Saint Tail is a normal school girl but when someone has been wronged she transforms into a magical thief and steals back for them what was wrongfully taken.

Sugisaki, Yukiru. D.N.Angel. Los Angeles, CA: TokyoPop, 1997-Present. Print.

After realizing his romantic feelings for his crush, Daisuke Niwa undergoes a transformation and becomes Dark Mousy, a famous thief. His mother tells him that it happens to all the men in his family and the only way to change back is to have his love returned by the object of his affection.

Kindle Imagine Develop (KID). Kaito Apricot. Tokyo: Takuyo, 2002. Digital Visual Novel. Multiple PlayStation and Windows Platforms.

In this interactive novel the reader has to help Anzu make decisions that will impact how she lives her life now that she has become the next Thief Apricot.

Meme, Iwaoka. Kaitou Thief Milky Drop. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 2007. Print.

This story was originally serialized in Ciao Magazine and has not yet been released in English.

Tanemura, Arina. Kamikaze Kaitou Jeanne. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 1998-2000. Print.

Maron Kusakabe is given a task no less vital than saving God! As the reincarnation of Jeanne D’Arc she has to gather up pieces of God’s power and return it to Him. His power is hidden in pieces of artwork though so whenever she captures one it appears to others as though she has stolen the artwork.

Science-Fiction or Sci-Fi manga includes stories which seem just beyond the reach of current possibilities. They usually take place off Earth, in a parallel universe, or a time far distant from ours. Unlike Fantasy or adventure stories, Sci-Fi stories mostly follow the rules of the real world, as they are used as a way to explore what may be.

Arikawa, Hiro. Library Wars. Illus. Kiiro Yumi. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2007-Present. Print.

When the government seeks to destroy the books it deems as a threat, the libraries will fight to keep their collections safe.

Hagio, Moto. They were Eleven. Tokyo: Kodansha, 1975. Print.

Ten astronauts get into a spaceship in search of personal glory. After reaching (a rapidly decaying) orbit around a star they discover there are 11 of them in the ship. Who is the extra traveler? Nobody remembers well enough to be certain which of the others were supposed to be there!

Hiwatari, Saki. Please Save my Earth. 21 Vol. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 1987-1994. Print.

A group of teenagers discover that what they always thought were their personal reoccurring dreams might instead be repressed memories from their previous lives.

Mishihara, Katsumi. Legend of Galactic Heroes: Golden Wings. Tokyo: Chara, 1986. Print.

This story follows the intricate politics and warring ambitions of a future Milky Way Galaxy in turmoil.

Supernatural – These stories are ones which are usually set in the world we inhabit with only some minor additions. Characters in this genre include magical beings or occult entities, those creatures which are not generally thought of as “real.”

Hino, Matsuri. Vampire Knight. 19 Vol. San Francisco: Viz, 2004-2013. Print.

Yuki’s first memory is when she was turned into a vampire. Ten years later, after she is adopted by the headmaster of an elite vampire boarding school she finds herself the guardian of the entire vampire race.

 

Ishikawa, Emi. Screaming Lessons. Tokyo: Shueisha, 2008-Present. Print.

This is a compilation of short horror stories narrated by a ghost girl. Currently it is only being published in Japanese.

 

Sakurakoji, Kanoko. Black Bird. 18 Vol. San Francisco: Viz, 2007-2013. Print.

Misao can see supernatural beings. Usually they leave her alone and just do their own harmless things but when they suddenly start trying to kill her, she finds out that her blood could give special powers to the supernatural beings.  Now she must rely on her childhood friend, a demon himself, to help her stay alive.

Shiomi, Chika. Yurara. 5 Vol. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2003-2005. Print.

A girl who can see spirts and determine their feelings, has a guardian spirit and can set ghosts on other people. She also finds that two boys in her class also have supernatural powers.

Suzuki, Julietta. Kamisama Hajimemashita. San Francisco: Viz, 2008-Present. Print.

Nanami saves Mikage from a dog and is rewarded by him with a new home. The new home turns out to be a shire and she is now being marked as an Earth Deity. She finds herself falling in love with Mikage’s old familiar and despite it being a forbidden love, he starts to find that he returns her love.

Sports manga are very popular in Japan as well as in the U.S. These stories center on a sports team or a particular person who is very heavily involved in a sport. Many of these could also be considered “slice-of-life” stories in which people are just living their normal lives, which include a great deal of focus on sports. While shojo sports manga do have a fair share of ice skating and ballet focused stories there are also plenty of basketball and soccer centered ones as well.

Ichimura, Hitoshi. CODA. Tokyo: Comic Avarus, 2010-2012. Print.

Kunisada Haruichi  is studying Japanese dance when he meets a famous ballet dancer who discovers his weakness and forces him to cross dress on stage.

Shinonome, Mizuo. Princess Tutu. Houston, TX: ADV Manga, 2003. Print.

This story has some magical girl aspects. Drosselmeyer is an author who has the ability to make his stories come to life. He dies with a story half finished and, as a ghost, decides he needs to finish the story. In his story he gives a little duck a magic pendant which turns him into a ballerina named Princess Tutu.

Kachiki, Hikaru. Baby Steps. Tokyo: Kodansha, 2007-present. Print.

Eiichirō Maruo wants to make some changes to his lifestyle and get some more exercise so he joins the tennis club where he uses his bookish nature to study his competition and increase his own skills.

Takanashi, Mitsuba. Crimson Hero. 20 Vol. San Francisco: Viz, 2003-2011. Print.

Nobara Sumiyoshi is a tomboy whose mother disapproves of her interest in sports so she leaves home to be the housemother for a men’s volleyball team.

Mitsubachi, Miyuki. Namaikizakari. Tokyo: Hakusensha, 2013-Present. Print.

This story about love and basketball is currently only available in Japanese.

Ryori Manga is manga about food. Food is a very important part of life and, as these stories attest, it can sometimes also be the focus of a person’s attention. Some food manga focuses on the chief, some on the recipes and some on the experience of eating.

Kobayashi, Miyuki. Kitchen Princess. 10 Vol. New York: Del Rey Manga, 2004-2008. Print.

After being orphaned, Najika is given some flan by a boy in hopes of cheering her up. She promises to make him the best dessert he’s ever had and so she learns to cook and begins to search for him.

Shouko, Akira. Chocolate cake, Shooting Star. Tokyo: Shouko Akira, 2008. Print.

Hiro’s friend asks him to help her make a cake for her crush, but that causes him a conflict of interest. Currently this story is only available in Japanese and was published as a stand-alone book, not in a magazine.

Komura, Ayumi. Mixed Vegetables. 8 Vol. San Francisco: Viz, 2005-2007. Print.

Hanayu is the daughter of a pastry chef but wants to be a sushi chef. Hayato is the son of a sushi chef but wants to be a pastry chef. If they get married will they both be able to pursue their dreams without disappointing their parents?

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Adults

Seijin Manga – means adult stories…seijin manga are those which are only to be sold to adults usually due to being sexually explicit – they would be considered a subgenre of josei or seinen depending on if their intended audience is female or male

Hentai Manga – While the literal meaning is “strange” or “weird”, it is often used to describe explicit works depicting sexual themes or pornography. In common usage, the term hentai has come to mean fetishism or bizarre pornography and that is what will be highlighted here. These works include the subgenres of: “funtanari” which involves hermaphrodic characters; “lolicon” which features young girls; “shotacon” which features young boys; “kimono” which features anthropomorphized animals; and BDSM stories. There are many other types of Manga pornography which can be found below, listed under their intended audiences.

 Hime. Tokyo: Wanimagazine, 2011-Present. Print.

Hime is one of the most popular hentai magazines in Japan from a publisher who specializes in the genre. They offer some content digitally in English.

Kondom. Bondage Fairies. Seattle, WA: Eros Comix, 1990-1991. Print.

This story focuses on female human-like fairies who engage in a broad range of sexual activities.

 Lemon People. Tokyo: Kubo Shoten, 1982-1998. Print.

This magazine went out of publication in 1998 but it was one of the first to present funny or farcical hentai stories that were meant to be taken lightly.

Maeda, Toshio. La Blue Girl. 6 Vol. Tokyo: Leed-sha, 1989-1992. Print.

As a way to get around legal restrictions, tentacled monsters are common in hentai manga. This story is one of those which features this theme and even sometimes pokes fun at the over use of tentacle monsters in the genre.

Tagame, Gengoroh. Jujitsu Kyoshi and Other Stories: Collected Short Pieces. B Product, 2004. Print.

This is a collection of stories from a Manga-ka who is well known for his BDSM stories which feature pairings of strong masculine men.

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Men

Seinen manga – men’s manga – stories written for an audience of grown men…they address adult concerns but are not necessarily inappropriate for children.

Magazines – Magazines are common launching platforms for new Manga stories. These are some of the most popular seinen magazines intended to bring new stories to an audience of adult men. These magazines often promote tie-ins with video games and anime franchises.

Big Comic Original. Toyko: Shogakukan, 1972-Present. Print.

Aimed at older adult men, with most of its readers over 30, this magazine publishes a wide variety of stories and does not focus on fantasy or action as some other magazines do.

Champion Red. Toyko: Akita Shoten, 2002- Present. Print.

This magazine is published monthly and was the original home of many seinen stories including Change 123.

Comic Valkyrie. Toyko: Kill Time Communication, 2006- Present. Print.

This magazine is aimed at men in the lower age range of seinen publications and focuses on publishing science fiction stories.

 

Dengeki Maoh. Toyko: ASCII Media Works. 2005-Present. Print.

This magazine includes manga but also has information on video games and light novels that may be of interest to its readers as well.

Manga Action. Toyko: Futabasha, 1967-Present. Print.

This is considered to be the first seinen magazine as it became puplication in 1967. It was the original home of some classics in seinen manga such as Lupin III.

 Weekly Manga Times. Toyko: Houbunsha, 1956-Present. Print.

This magazine, began in 1956 claims to be the first manga magazine to be published regularly. It contains several features which recur in each issue and has many awards for its continuity.

Young Ace. Toyko: Kadokawa Shoten, 2009. Print.

This magazine was the original home of Blood Lad and Neon Genesis Evangelion.

 Young Gangan. Toyko: Square Enix, 2004-Present. Print

 This magazine is part of a whole line a magazines by Square Enix which are all targeted at different audiences.

Weekly Manga Goraku. Toyko: Nihon Bungeisha, 1968-Present. Print.

This magazine is aimed at the older, salarymen contingent of the seinen market.

 Weekly Young Jump. Toyko: Shueisha, 1979-Present. Print.

Part of the jump line of magazines published by Shueisha, this magazine is aimed at the seinen audience and has several supplemental publications which come out less frequently.

Weekly Young Magazine. Toyko: Kondansha, 1980-Present. Print.

Like many other seinen magazines, this one prominently features several pages of color photographs of models in suggestive poses in addition to carrying manga stories.

 

Sararimman – “Salaryman” is a term used for men who work for a company and earn a salary from their corporate jobs. These stories are about the life of a business man. They focus on the balancing act between home and work, long hours, low prestige and the fear of “karoski” (death from overwork).

Aoki, Yuji. The Way of the Osaka Loan Shark. 19 Vol. Tokyo: Kondansha, 1990-1996. Print.

The main character in this series, Tatsuyuki Haibara, is a very capable young business man but he has a hard time finding a job and ends up working for a very shady company where he grudgingly becomes a loan shark for the yakuza.

Hoshisato, Mochiru. Living Game. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 1990-1993. Print.

Office worker Raizo Fuwa ends up using his small apartment as an office when the new building they are supposed to move into gets condemned. He develops a romantic relationship with a young girl who gets hired by his company after she ends up working and living in his apartment with him.

Motomiya, Hiroshi. Salaryman Kintaro. 30 Vol. Tokyo: Sheuisha, 1994-2002. Print.

Kintaro Yajima is a former “Biker” who has honored a promise to his dead wife and has become a salaryman.

Haremumono – Harem manga, does not necessarily refer to sexual relationships surrounded by numerous female characters who occupy subordinate roles.

Gokurakuin, Sakurako. Sekirei. Tokyo: Square Enix, 2004-Present. Print.

This story is very much ecchi but still relatively innocent. It is a supernatural comedy about 108 beautiful ladies who literally come out of thin air to each partner up with a human male to battle each other.

Kozuki, Tsukasa. Ladies versus Butlers. Illus. Nekoyashiki-Nekomaru. Toyko: ASCII Media Works, 2008. Print.

Akiharu decides to go to boarding school so that he no longer burdens his uncle’s family. He signs up for classes to become a butler but discovers that his appearance frightens the other students.

Mattsu. He is My Master. Illus. Asu Tsubaki. Los Angeles, CA: Seven Seas, 2002-2009. Print.

After his parents die, Yoshitaka is left as a millionaire with his own mansion. He needs to hire staff to look after his house so he hires a trio of beautiful young girls.

Sae, Amatsu. Guardian Hearts. Tokyo: Kadokawa Shoten, 2001-2005. Print.

Hina is a Guardian Heart, a protector of peace, and is not supposed to let anyone know her identity. However, she is accidently seen landing by Watari as she arrives on Earth. After he moves in with her to help keep her secret, he soon finds himself living with a bunch of Guardian Hearts who keep accidently revealing themselves to him.

Sakaki, Ichiro. Outbreak Company. Illus. Kiri Kajiya. Toyko: Kodansha, 2012-2014. Print.

After high school, Shin’ichi finds himself lost in his own world with his video games, anime and manga interests. He decides to get a job to break out of his rut and finds himself whisked away to an alternative world where he serves as a cultural ambassador.

Men’s Love or “ML” (stories about love between men),  Gei Comi (literally “gay comics”), Bara (an umbrella term for things related to homosexual men), and Shonen-ai (a term used mostly in the United States to refer to romantic feelings between men) – are all terms used to describe stories which are generally written by gay men and intended for a gay male audience. While some of these stories are romances or love stories between men focused more on the romantic and emotional aspects rather than on explicit descriptions of sex acts, some of them can be very graphic and they are often not intended or appropriate for children.

Badi. Tokyo: Terra Publications. Print.

This is a young gay men’s magazine. It carries all kinds of things that would be of interest to young gay men including manga geared specifically for that audience.

G-Men. Tokyo: Furukawa Shobu, 1994-Present. Print.

This is a magazine for gay men which features images of muscular men. It includes other things that would be of interest to gay men as well manga.

Ike, Reibun, ed. Hide and Seek. Gardenia, CA: Digital Manga Publishing, 2012. eBook.

While the editor of this collection is a woman who usually writes yaoi stories for women, in this instance she has collected stories which have previously been published in a variety of bara magazines.

Ito, Bungaku, ed. Barazoku. Tokyo: Daini Shobo, 1971-2004. Print.

This is a collection of ML stories originally from bara magazines. Currently it has only been published in Japanese.

Yoshinaga, Fumi. What Did You Eat Yesterday? New York: Vertical, 2014. Print.

This is a sweet, romantic, slice-of-life story about a chef and his partner.

 

Kaito (or kaitou) – Gentleman thief. These stories feature a protagonist who behaves contrary to normal protagonists. A “gentleman thief” is usually one who uses his thievery as a means to right a wrong, a Robin Hood type character. At the very least a gentleman thief ensures that innocent people will not be hurt in his quest to fulfill his own needs.

Panchi, Monki, Ray Yoshimoto, and Matt Yamashita. Lupin III. Los Angeles, CA: ToykoPop, 2003. Print.

This story follows Arsene Lupin the Third, the grandson of the original gentleman thief from the French novels of the early 1900’s.

Itaba, Hiroshi. Mouse. 14 Vol. Tokyo: Hakusensha, 1999-2004. Print.

For the last 400 years Mouse has been stealing cash and valuables, especially those which are not the rightful property of their current owners. Of course, over the years numerous people have held the title of Mouse but they have all been members of Sorata Muon’s family.

Koyoka, Yoshino. Aria the Scarlet Ammo. Gardenia, CA: Digital Manga, 2009-Present. eBook.

In this series Aria’s Nemesis, Riko Mine, is a kaito decended from Arsene Lupin.

Morita, Takashi. A Story of Arsene Lupin Adventurier.  Tokyo: Horozu, 2014. Print.

This story is a manga adaptation of the original Arsene Lupin stories by Maurice Leblanc.

 Ohara, Shinji. Niju Menso no Musume. 8 Vol. Toyko: Media Factory, 2002-2007. Print.

Chizuko lives with her aunt and uncle after the death of her parents. When she discovers that her aunt is trying to slowly poison her so that they can take her inheritance she runs away with the butler who happens to be Twenty Faces, a notorious thief, there to steal her inheritance as well. Twenty Faces takes her under his wing and she becomes a master thief as well.

 

Martial Arts Manga Ansatsuken – literally “assassination fist” or Satsujinken literally “murder fist” are words used in Japanese to indicate a form of martial arts which is developed in order to kill an opponent. The stories in this section are ones which feature the use of martial arts, war, or martial actions as a main plot point often with the goal of killing or eliminating completely the “bad guys.” Unlike in the stories in the shonen category these stories do not always have comic relief and can therefore be very dark.

Oota, Moare. Teppuu. Tokyo: Kondansha, 2008-Present. Print.

Ishidou is so good at sports that they begin to lose their allure, until she receives an invitation from an annoyingly chipper girl to join her martial arts club.

Sakaguchi, Iku. Change 123. Illus. Shiuri Iwasawa. 12 Vol. Tokyo: Akita Shoten, 2005-2010. Print.

Thi is the story of a girl raised by three men each of whom was an expert in a different style of martial arts. Due to this strangle childhood she developed multiple personalities. When a boy falls in love with all three of her personalities and all of them fall in love with him too, they all attempt to curb her violent behavior and merge her personalities into one.

Shiozaki, Yuji. Battle Vixens. Los Angeles: TokyoPop, 2004. Print.

This is the story of seven schools who are engaged in a turf war using the powers held in medallions from the Three Kingdoms Era.

Yagami, Yu. Those Who Hunt Elves. 21 Vol. Houston, TX: ADV Manga, 1994-2003. Print.

In order to get back home to Japan the Elf Hunters must find five

spell fragments which are on the skin of the elves.

Science-Fiction or Sci-Fi manga includes stories which seem just beyond the reach of current possibilities. They usually take place off Earth, in a parallel universe, or a time far distant from ours. Unlike Fantasy or adventure stories Sci-Fi stories mostly follow the rules of the real world, as they are used as a way to explore what may be.

Isayama, Hajime. Attack on Titan. Tokyo: Kondanasha, 2012. Print.

This story involves human-like giants called Titans who, without explanation, eat humans and have taken over much of the planet. The humans who remain have built a triple walled city in which life has been going on unbothered by the Titans for a hundred years, until the attacks begin.

Sakurazaka, Hiroshi. All you Need is Kill. San Francisco: Viz, 2004. Print.

Keniji is killed in his first battle as a defender of the Earth from mysterious invaders. Much to his surprise, he wakes back up the next day in the day before the battle. As he is stuck in a time loop he eventually begins to improve his skill as a fighter in hopes of breaking the cycle.

Smith, Toren, Adam Warren, Haruka Takachiho, et al. Dirty Pair. Forestville, CA: Eclipse Comics, 1988. Print.

In a future where humans have spread out to several neighboring star systems, “trouble consultants” help to deal with interplanetary problems. One pair (the titular Dirty Pair) of these consultants is known for the destruction they leave in their wake.

Yumizuru, Izuru. IS<Infinite Stratos>. 5 Vol. Tokyo: Media Factory, 2010-2012. Print.

The Infinite Stratos is an exoskeleton system that far out powers any other weapon system in existence. Even though all the nations of the world have the technology and everyone has agreed to not use the technology for warfare, since only women can operate the system they are now the sex that is in power around the whole world. When one young boy discovers he has the power to operate the system, he “gets” to go to a pilot school full of girls.

Supernatural – These stories are ones which are usually set in the world we inhabit with only some minor additions. Characters in this genre include magical beings or occult entities, those creatures which are not generally thought of as “real.”

Kodama, Yuuki. Blood Lad. Melissa Tanaka Trans. New York: Yen Press, 2012. eBook.

Staz is a vampire who does not drink human blood.  One day he meets an ordinary girl. During their first meeting she is attacked and killed showing back up as a ghost. Staz pledges to help her get her life back.

ONE. One Punch Man. Illus. Yusuke Murata. San Francisco: Viz, 2014. eBook.

One Punch Man is a superhero who is so strong that he can take out most foes with just one punch. Even though he is always saving the city from mysterious monsters that appear out of nowhere, he still struggles to get the respect he deserves due to his rather plain appearance.

Tamaki, Nozomu. Dance in the Vampire Bund. Los Angles: Seven Seas Entertainment, 2005-2013. Print.

Mina is the ruler of all the vampires and has negotiated for a home for the vampires off the coast of Japan where she hopes to live in peace co-existing with humans.

Yamamoto, Hideo. Homunculus. Paris, France: Editions Tonkam, 2005. Print.

This story explores the possibility that trepanation brings out a person’s sixth sense. Nakoshi is the perfect test subject for this idea because he is already living between two worlds, that of the rich and the poor.

Sports manga are very popular in Japan as well as in the U.S. These stories center around a sports team or a particular person who is very heavily involved in a sport. Many of these could also be considered “slice-of-life” stories in which people are just living their normal lives which include a great deal of focus on sports. There are sports manga for just about any sport one could imagine, including less physical ones such as chess, or mahjong.

Furuya, Minoru. Ping Pong Club. 13 Vol. Tokyo: Kondansha, 1993-1996. Print.

This story follows the members of a middle school ping pong club. It is a comedy as each member has strange quirks of his/her own.

Kaori, Saki. Smash!. 18 Vol. Tokyo: Kondansha, 2006-2010. Print.

This story is about a boy who plays badminton. It is a romance story between the boy and a mystery girl whom he seeks out after she beats him in a game.

Kusunoki, Michiharu. Wangan Midnight. 42 Vol. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 1990-2008. Print.

This manga is about Akio Asakura, a high school boy who loves car racing. In an effort to get a better car, he ends up buying one that is said to be cursed and then he even finds out one of its previous owners who was killed in an accident had his same name.

Ohwada, Hideki. Legend of Koizumi. Tokyo: Takeshobo, 2006-Present. Print.

This is a satire manga about real life politicians including the Prime Minister who is an avid mahjong player.

Shibata, Yokusaru. 81 Diver. Tokyo: Shueisha, 2006-2014. Print.

This manga is about a shogi player who “dives into the 9 by 9 square board”.

Yaguchi, Takao. Fishing Enthusiast Sanpei. 65 Vol. Tokyo: Kondansha, 1973-1983. Print.

This is a comedy manga about a boy who is an excellent fisherman.

Ryori Manga is manga about food. Food is a very important part of life and, as these stories attest, it can sometimes also be the focus of a person’s attention. Some food manga focuses on the chef, some on the recipes and some on the experience of eating.

Funatsu, Kazuki. Addicted to Curry. Tokyo: Shueisha, 2001-2012. Print.

This story is about a young man who, as repayment for her kindness, helps a girl who is trying to save her father’s curry restaurant.

Hayase, Jun and Kan Sakurai. Ekiben Hitoritabi Comic. Tokyo: Futabasha, 2012. Print.

This story is about a man who travels by train and the food he eats as he travels. Currently it is only available in Japanese.

Joh, Araki. Bartender. Illus. Kenji Nagatomo. 21 Vol. Tokyo: Shueisha, 2004-2011. Print.

Ryu Sasakura, a magnificent bartender, makes the best drinks anyone has ever had. Only people who are invited may come into his bar where he gives them the best drinks and helps them solve their problems.

Kariya, Tetsu, and Akira Hanasaki. Oishinbo. San Francisco: Viz, 2005. Print.

The title of this manga translates as “The Gourmet”. The series follows a journalist who writes about his adventures in eating. In the Viz publications, the stories are collected to deliver stories involved in a certain type of food in each volume.

Otsubo, Maki. The Poor Man’s Dining Table (The Table of the Poor). Tokyo: Shinchosha, 2001. eBook.

This story follows two children after the death of their mother. Their father, who is very lazy, struggles to make ends meet and keeps their bellies full with some very interesting creations on a very tight budget.

Tsuchiyama, Shigeru. Gokudou Meshi (Gangster’s Feast). Tokyo: Futabasha, 2006. Print.

During their special New Year’s meal eight criminals compete to tell the best story of the greatest meal they have ever had.

Tsukuda, Yuto. Food Wars. Illus. Shun Saki. San Francisco: Viz, 2014. Print.

Soma Yukihira plans to take over cooking in his father’s restaurant and even to surpass him in skill. When his father closes down his restaurant, Soma decides to go to an elite cooking school where only 10% of the students are allowed to graduate.

Ueyama, Tochi. Cooking Papa. Tokyo: Kondansha, 1985-Present. Print.

The title character in this story is a salary-man who hides the fact that he is a brilliant cook from his colleagues. There are recipes in the book for the meals fixed in the story.

Historical Fiction – While these stories aren’t true they borrow their setting or main characters from real world history.

Kobayashi, Motofumi. Apocalypse Meow. Houston, TX: ADV Manga, 1998-Present. Print.

Kemono manga in which three anthropomorphic animals are American soldiers in the Vietnam War.

Nakamura, Hikaru. Saint Young Men. Tokyo: Kondansha, 2006-Present. Print.

This is a story about Jesus and Buddha as roommates during a vacation to Earth. It is a comedy series and involves their goodness getting them into trouble as they try to negotiate life in modern Tokyo.

Tezuka, Osamu. Buddha. New York: Vertical, 1972-1983. Print.

This story is about the life of Gautama Buddha. It is not actually a true story though it does follow some true events. It is said to be a very gritty story and contains some sexual episodes.

—.  Message to Adolf. San Francisco: Viz, 1983-1985. Print.

Message to Adolf follows three men each with the given name Adolf during the time leading up to WWII. One of the men is Adolf Hitler, the other two are each of mixed Japanese and German decent and one of them is Jewish.

Yukimura, Makoto. Vinland Saga. Tokyo: Kondansha Comics, 2013. Print.

Thorfinn joins with the band of Vikings who killed his father in order to find the perfect chance to have his revenge on their leader, Askeladd.

 

Parenting – Focusing on a subject near and even central to the lives of many adults, these stories surrounding the trials and tribulations of raising children can be both heartwarming and heart-rending, sometimes all at once.

Yamahana, Noriyuki. Orange Yane no Chiisana Ie. Tokyo: Shueisha, 2005-2008. Print.

A divorced man and divorced woman, both with their children in tow, find they have each been sold the same house.

Yumeka, Sumomo. My Girl Sahara Mizu. Tokyo: Shinchosha, 2006-2010. Print.

After the love of his life dies, Kazama finds the daughter he never knew he had and finds a new love.

Return to Table of Contents

 

 


 

Women

Josei Manga – women’s manga intended for a grownup audience…they address adult concerns but are not necessarily inappropriate for children, simply not intended for them.

Magazines – Magazines are common launching platforms for new Manga stories. These are some of the most popular josei magazines intended to bring new stories to an audience of adult women.

Cocohana. Tokyo: Shueisha, 1994-Present. Print.

This is a josei magazine which is published monthly. It was formerly published under the name Chorus.

Feel Young. Tokyo: Shodensha, 1989-Present.

Flowers. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 2002-Present. Print.

 For Mrs. Tokyo: Akita Shoten, 1986. Print.

This monthly josei magazine is aimed at a target audience of housewives.

Kiss. Tokyo: Kondansha, 1992-Present. Print.

This magazine has switched back and forth between monthly and bimonthly releases but it iscurrently released monthly.

Monthly Comic Zero Sum. Tokyo: Ichijinsha, 2002-Present. Print.

This magazine carries stories in a variety of genres and has created a spin off magazine, Comic Zero Sum Zokan Ward, which is published irregularly.

Petit Comic. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 2009-Present. Print.

This magazine is aimed at young women within the josei market. It specializes in romance stories.

Kyariauman – A “Career  woman” is a woman who works outside the home in a career for personal fulfillment and intends to continue doing so irrespective of her marital status. An “Office Lady” however, is a woman working in a so called “pink collar job”, one who often plans to marry, have children, and leave the workforce. These stories all revolve around women working outside the home for a salary. Some are about the struggles and joys that the characters encounter because of their professions while others are escapist fantasies about office ladies who save the world.

Akizuki, Risu. Survival in the Office: The Evolution of Japanese Working Women. Tokyo: Kondansha, 1999. Print.

Released in 4 panel comic strip format, this manga provides a funny look into the lives of office ladies.

Asano, Inio. Solanin. 2 Vol. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2005-2006. Print

This story follows a couple as they seek to make a life for themselves. Meiko takes a job as an office lady to pay the rent while Taneda finds work as an illustrator and continues playing in a band with his college friends.

Okazaki, Mari. Suppli. Los Angeles: TokyoPop, 2007. Print.

This story follows Minami, an office lady, as she begins to pursue a social life with her co-workers.

Sakuma, Haruko. How Misuzu Got a Leg Up. G2 Comix, 2014. eBook.

Misuzu finds her boring and monotonous life as an office lady changing when she catches one the salesmen having sex with another girl in the boardroom.

Yasuda, Hiroyuki. Shomuni. 5 Vol. Tokyo: Kondansha, 1996-1997. Print.

This story is about a group of office ladies who have been assigned to the department of menial jobs designed to get them to quit. Instead of quitting though they devise a way to save the company!

 

 

Gyakuharemu – Reverse harem, does not necessarily refer to sexual relationships between characters, though it can. It simply means that the main character (in this case a female) is surrounded by numerous male characters who occupy subordinate roles.

Enjouji, Maki. Yoru Café. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 2008. Print.

After the death of her husband, whom she dearly loved, Hina inherits his cafe. Even though she has determined to never fall in love again, she finds that a hard promise to keep surrounded by all her male employees.

Saito, Chiho. First Girl. 5 Vol. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 2002-2003. Print.

A young girl is sold off to a South American business man. They end up falling in love, but a revolution causes some unexpected turns in their romance.

Watanabe, Taeko. Kaze Hikaru. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 1997-Present. Print.

Tominaga Sei is a girl who pretends to be a boy to join the military in order to get revenge for her father and brother’s murders.

 

Romance – One of the more prolific genres for girls of all ages is the romance story. Some Manga romance stories, even those for the shojo or shoenen audience, are a bit intense, sexual, and risqué, the term for this is “Ecchi.”

Hagio, Moto. A Drunken Dream and Other Stories. Matt Thorn Trans. Seattle, WA: Fantagraphics, 2010. Print.

This is a collection of Moto Hagio’s manga stories from 1970-2007.

Ogawa, Yayoi. Tramps Like Us (Kimi wa Pet). 14 Vol. Los Angeles, TokyoPop, 2000-2005. Print.

Sumire is a career woman who has very unfeminine hobbies. After her boyfriend leaves her she takes in a homeless man as a “pet”. Even though she says he is not up to her standards for a relationship there is signs of a relationship building.

Sakurazawa, Erica. The Aromatic Bitters. Los Angeles, CA: TokyoPop, 2004. Print.

A pair of girl friends rethink their lives when they both end relationships with cheating men and strike out to find new love with younger men.

Yazawa, Ai. Nana. San Francisco: Viz, 2000-2009. Print.

Two girls, both named Nana, meet up by chance and end up living together as they seek to establish themselves in Tokyo.

Yoshihara, Yuki. Butterflies, Flowers. 8 Vol. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2006-20093. Print.

After Choko’s family loses their fortune, she goes to work in an office only to find that her tyrant of a boss is her former servant.

Yaoi – stories about men who love other men. These stories are written mostly by women for a female audience…these stories usually focus on explicit sex acts more than focusing on character development or romance – they are considered a subgenre of josei seijin.

em, est. Red Blinds the Foolish. Torrance, CA: Aurora, 2008. Print.

This is a collection of several short stories of men in love.

Hazuki, Kanae. Voices of Love. Torrance, CA: Aurora, 2008. Print.

A young boy who hates his own voice meets an older man whose voice he loves. The two try to figure out their feelings for each other as they work toward their dreams in the theater world.

Higuri, You. Gakuen Heaven. Los Angeles: BLU, 2004. Print.

This manga is part of a whole franchise. The story follows the boys who attend Bell Liberty (BL) Academy.

Kazuma, Kodaka. Kizuna: Bonds of Love. 11 Vol. Gardena, CA: Digital Manga, 1992-2008. eBook.

This story is about a pair of boys who meet in high school and fall in love with many pitfalls (including finding that one of the boys is the son of a yakuza boss) which strengthens their mutual affection.

Kunieda, Saika. Future Lovers. 2 Vol. Torrance, CA: Aurora Publishing, 2008. Print.

After his girlfriend turns down his marriage proposal, Kento gets drunk and goes home with a man. They then embark on a long-lasting relationship like none Kento every expected.

Kotobuki, Tarako. Love Pistols. San Francisco, CA: SuBLime, 2007-2008. Print.

This story is a sci-fi yaoi in which it is asserted that some humans are descended from other animals than apes.

 

Yuri – means girl love (GL). Another term sometimes used in America is shoujo-ai. These stories usually focus on the romantic or emotional aspects of the relationships between females and are not very explicit. These examples are a sub set of josei seijin though yuri stories can be found for every target audience.

Adachi, Tetsu. Weather Woman. New York: Central Park Media, 1992-1994. Print.

Keiko is an office worker who takes advantage of her one shot on-air filling in for the regular weather reporter to flash her underwear on live tv and send the network’s ratings soaring.

Akimi, Yoshida. The Cherry Orchard. Tokyo: Hakusensha, 1985-1986. Print.

The drama club of an all-girl’s school is putting on the play of the same name.

Kiriko, Nananan. Blue. Fanfare: Doddington, England, 1996. Print.

Two high school girls find that their friendship is becoming something more and struggle to come to terms with the ramifications of their feelings.

Nobuko, Yoshiya. Hana Monogatari. Tokyo: Kokusho Kankokai, 1995. Print.

This is a collection of stories about female romances.  Primarily they are about unrequited love and longing from afar.

Yamagishi, Ryoko. Shiroi Heya no Futari. Tokyo: Shueisha, 1971. Print.

This is the story of two girls who are very different but after rooming together at boarding school become very close friends. After rumors that they are more than friends begin to circulate they try to distance themselves from each other with tragic results.

Science-Fiction or Sci-Fi manga includes stories which seem just beyond the reach of current possibilities. They usually take place off Earth, in a parallel universe, or a time far distant from ours. Unlike Fantasy or adventure stories Sci-Fi stories mostly follow the rules of the real world, as they are used as a way to explore what may be.

Asano, Atsuko. No. 6. 9 Vol. Tokyo: Kondansha, 2003-2011. Print.

In an ideal city called No.6, a privileged young boy helps to shelter another boy in need that changes their lives forever.

Soryo, Fuyumi. Eternal Sabbath. 8 Vol. New York: Del Rey, 2002-2004. Print.

Scientists have developed the ES gene which will allow those who carry it to live up to 200 years and be immune to viruses. An unintended side effect of the gene is that it also makes the carriers able to control the minds and memories of others.

Tamura, Yumi. 7 Seeds. Tokyo: Shogakukan, 2001-Present. Print.

After learning that the Earth is about to be hit by a life-ending meteorite, each nation cryogenically freezes some of their young people so they can repopulate the Earth. This story follows them as they are unfrozen in a world bare of other humans.

Vaughan, Brian. Saga. Illus. Fiona Staples. Berkeley, CA: Image Comics, 2012. Print.

This series follows a husband and wife from alien races which have long been at war with each other. The couple must flee from authorities of both species as they also fight through the trials of raising their daughter.

Supernatural – These stories are ones which are usually set in the world we inhabit with only some minor additions. Characters in this genre include magical beings or occult entities, those creatures which are not generally thought of as “real.”

Akino, Matsuri. Pet Shop of Horrors. 10 Vol. Los Angeles, CA: TokyoPop, 1995-1998. Print.

A mysterious pet shop in Los Angeles’ Chinatown carries some truly bizarre animals. The animals each come with a contract outlining things the new owner must not do. When the owners break the contracts some terrifying consequences ensue.

Joyner, Katrina. The Heavenly Bride. Writers of the Apocalypse, 2009. Webmanga.

This story is about a dragon who becomes a vampire and his attraction to a girl. It is an American style manga story and is intended for adults only.

Shiomi, Chika. Rasetsu. San Francisco, CA: Viz, 2012. Print.

Rasetsu is an exorcist who has been marked for death by a demon unless she finds true love.

Tomu, Ohmi. Midnight Secretary. San Francisco: Viz, 2006-2009. Print.

Kaya discovers that her boss is a vampire, yet she still seeks to be the best secretary she can.

Yamane, Ayano. The Crimson Spell. San Francisco, CA: SuBLime, 2006-Present. Print.

This manga is a supernatural yaoi story about a boy who uses a cursed sword and becomes a bloodthirsty, lusty demon during the nights.

Mystery, Horror, and Suspense stories are always popular themes amongst adult women’s literature so it is no surprise to find many manga in this vein as well. These stories tell about detectives who solve crimes and the villains who commit them, as well as traveling into the terrifying depth of the human mind.

Maruo, Suehiro. The Strange Tale of Panorama Island. San Francisco: Last Gasp, 2013. Print.

Based in 1920s Japan, this story tells of a young man who discovers he has a strong resemblance to a rich dead man. He decides to impersonate the dead man to take over the dead man’s life, money, wife and all.

Naka, Tomoko. Madame Joker. Tokyo: Futabasha, 2003. Print.

Ranko Gekkouji is a wealthy beauty who solves crimes.

Nakamura, Asumiko. Utsubora – The Story of a Novelist. New York: Vertical, 2013. Print.

A young novelist who is about to hit it big with her first novel is found dead. It appears to be a suicide but those closest to her don’t believe it.

Okazaki, Kyoko. Helter-Skelter. New York: Vertical, 1995-1996. Print.

Supermodel undergoes full body plastic surgery to try to be perfect. Her body and mind break down in this psychological horror story.

Sports manga are very popular in Japan as well as in the U.S. These stories center around a sports team or a particular person who is very heavily involved in a sport. Many of these could also be considered “slice-of-life” stories in which people are just living their normal lives which include a great deal of focus on sports. Many of the most popular in the josei category focus on ice skating or ballet.

Suetsugu, Yuki. Chihayafuru. Tokyo: Kodansha, 2011. Print.

Chihaya has always focused on helping her sister with her modeling caeer. When she meets a boy who is an excellent karuta player and he tells her he thinks she could become a champion at it, she begins to dedicate herself to the card game.

Yayoi, Ogawa. Kiss and Never Cry. Tokyo: Kondansha, 2008. Print.

Michiru is a happy, carefree girl who loves ice skating. After a fight with her mom she runs away and they find her at the ice rink, but something has changed.

Chiho, Saitou. Ice Forest. Tokyo: Shougakukan, 2009. Print.

Yukino was a ice skater who was injured and stopped skating. One day she meets up with another skater who suggests she team up with a young man who is a champion and start pair skating.

—. The Other Marionette. Tokyo: Shougakukan, 2011. Print.

When Nanami’s father asks Jin to deliver a bouquet of flowers to her, Jin sees what great talent she has. He offers to pay for her to go to ballet school if she will act in his theater company.

Ricotta. Warukyūre Romantse Shōjo Kishi Monogatari. Ricotta, 2011. Digital Interactive Text Visual Novel. Windows Platform.

In an interactive digital novel the readers make choices for the characters and influence the outcome of the story. This digital novel follows the romance story of a jousting team.

 

Ryori Manga is manga about food. Food is a very important part of life and, as these stories attest, it can sometimes also be the focus of a person’s attention. Some food manga focuses on the chief, some on the recipes and some on the experience of eating.

Aogiri, Natsu. Flat. Tokyo: Mag Garden, 2008. Print.

High schooler Heisuke loves to eat and to cook desserts. When he meets up with his cousin and starts feeding him the delicious dessert he makes, they start to form a bond that will change them both.

Makimura, Satoru. Oishii Kankei. Tokyo: Shueisha, 1993. Print.

This series follows a girl who grew up rich. As a child she had delicious food all the time and came to love eating. After her father dies and she has to begin supporting her mother and herself, she realizes that she hates the food she cooks because she is a bad cook. One day she walks into a restaurant that serves delicious food she remembers from her childhood. She begs to be allowed to apprentice there and ends up falling in love with the head chef who hardly notices her.

Ono, Natsume, Ristorante Paradiso. Tokyo: Ohto Publishing, 2005. Print.

This story follows a girl who becomes an apprentice in her step-father’s restaurant in Rome. She meets a staff filled with very interesting and quirky characters.

Yoshinaga, Fumi. Antique Bakery. Gardenia, CA: Digital Manga Publishing, 1999-2002. eBook.

In addition to being about food this story is also a yaoi about the owner and workers of his bakery.

—. Not Love But Delicious Food (Make Me So Happy). New York: Yen Press, 2010. Print.

This manga follows a group of busy working women as they discuss their lives over good food at real Tokyo restaurants.

Historical Fiction – While these stories aren’t true they borrow their setting or main characters from real world history.

Yoshinaga, Fumi. Ooku: The Inner Chambers. San Francisco: Viz, 2005-Present. Print.

Disease has killed off most men leaving a matriarchal society in the Edo period of Japanese history.

Anno, Moyoco. Sakuran: Blossoms Wild. New York: Vertical, 2001. Print.

Kiyoha is a girl during the Edo period who flourishes in her life as a courtesan. She entertains the finest clientele and dresses and acts like a high class geisha despite being just a simple oiran in the “bad part of town.”

Mori, Kaoru. Emma. New York: CMX Comics, 2006. Print.

This story has a very intense fan following in Japan. It is set in Victorian England where Emma is a maid in the house of an upper class family where she falls for the son of the family.

Parenting – Focusing on a subject near and even central to the lives of many adults, these stories surrounding the trials and tribulations of raising children can be both heartwarming and heart-rending, sometimes all at once.

Aonuma, Takako. Mama Loves the Poyopoyo-saurus. 4 Vol. Tokyo: Fujinseikatsusha, 1993-1998. Print.

This manga is written in the 4-cell comic strip format. It follows the life of a young couple as they find the joy and work through the struggles of raising small children.

Miyauchi, Saya. Akkan Baby. Tokyo: Kondansha, 2001-2002. Print.

A carefree, unattached, but very sexually active, couple finds out that the girl is pregnant. This story follows them as they face the difficult choices that lay ahead of them.

Tobe, Keiko.  With The Light: Raising an Autistic Child. 15 Vol. New York: Yen Press, 2000-2010. Print.

This series is about a family whose son has autism. It begins with his birth and shows the slow realization by his mother that something is “not right.” It goes on to show the struggles, challenges and joys that the family faces.

Return to Table of Contents

 

 


 

Truth-Based Manga

There is also a wide variety of manga that are based on true stories and facts. They are intended for any audience and cover almost any topic from biographies, to scientific concepts, to economics. Some of these could be considered true non-fiction while others have exaggerated minor details or altered the names of characters. Also in this categor, are manuals which use a fictional story to explain a real concept.

Aki, Katsu. Futari Ecchi. Los Angeles, CA: TokyoPop, 1997-Present. Print.

This is an sex education series. It follows a couple, both of whom are virgins when they get together, as they learn about each other and their own bodies and find how to enjoy a healthy sex life together.

Ishinomori, Shotaro. Japan Inc: Introduction to Japanese Economics. Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 1988. Print.

This manga looks at the way the world’s economy works from the point of view of the Japanese businessman.

Katoh, Tadashi. Project X Challengers: Cup Noodle. Gardenia, CA: Digital Manga Publishing, 2006. Print.

The story behind the invention of the “cup noodle.”

Morio, Ayano. Warren Buffet: An Illustrated Biography of the World’s Most Successful Inventor. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2004. Print.

This is just as the title claims, a biography of Warren Buffet presented in manga style.

Nakazawa, Keiji. Barefoot Gen: A Cartoon Story of Hiroshima. San Francisco, CA: Last Gasp, 2004. Print.

While the protagonist in this story has a different name from the author it is meant to be a realistic portrayal of his own life growing up in Hiroshima around the time of the nuclear bomb drop.

Nitta, Hideo. Manga Guide to Physics. San Francisco, CA: No Starch Press, 2009. Print.

Part of a whole series of manga in which science and math concepts are explained using a story format with asides to help explain technical details.

Tatsumi, Yoshihiro. A Drifting Life. Montreal, QC, Canada: Drawn and Quarterly, 2008. Print.

Autobiography of the Manga-ka. It is considered “reality based” instead of technically non-fiction because it goes into things which happened inside the author’s head so they aren’t always “fact.”

Return to Table of Contents

Created by Amy Seipke, of The College for Creative Studies in Detroit, MI with support from the ALA Carnegie-Whitney Grant.

Annotations and publication information referenced from Amazon, Goodreads, and Wikipedia. Photos by Amy Seipke.

View titles available in our library at www.lib.collegeforcreativestudies.edu.

 

Supported by a Carnegie-Whitney Grant from the American Library Association.

 

 

Essential Manga: The Annotated Bibliography!! (pdf version)

Wow! It has been a busy year! Since I am off from work over the summer, I didn’t write any blog posts and then as soon as I got back in September it was crunch time. On top of the new special events our library hosted for the first time this semester, and some new showcases we put together around campus, my deliverables for this grant were due yesterday and they took a LOT more time than I thought they would!!!

Even though I was off for the summer, I still attended Otakon in Baltimore in August as part of my research for developing our manga collection at the library, which is after all my end goal. I saw so much and learned so many things but I have not had a minute to get them down on paper!

However, that will have to wait just a little bit longer though because tonight I want to share with you one of the documents that I put together for the American Library Association as partial fulfillment of the Carnegie-Whitney Grant.

Here is the pdf version of our Essential Manga: The Annotated Bibliography!

Also if you are going to make use this information anywhere else please be so kind as to properly cite it as: aseip [Amy Seipke]. “Essential Manga: The Annotated  Bibliography!! (pdf version)”. Essential Manga: The Making of an Annotated Bibliography. Detroit, MI: College for Creative Studies, 1 Dec. 2014. Blog. (date you looked at this information).    Thanks!

Final Manga Bibliography 2014.11.30

If you can’t view it in this pdf format for whatever reason just go here where I have it all typed out on screen.

Manga Terminology Part 2

So I realized my last post was getting kind of long and I hadn’t even gotten to my point yet! So here is my point… “There are a lot of new words I have encountered in studying Manga!”

So as it stands now here is the list of words that I have encountered and what I believe each to mean:

Kodomomuke – children’s manga…stories written specifically for children which usually contain a moral in an effort to teach a lesson – these remind me of Aesop’s Fables

Shojo or shoujo – girls manga – stories written for an audience of young girls

24-nengumi, “year 24 group”, or the “1940-ers” refers to a group of women shojo writers who were born in or around 1949. Previously shojo was written mostly by men.

Mahou shoujo or majokko features young girls who use magic – a subgenre of shojo

Shonen manga- boys’ manga – stories written for an audience of young boys

Mecha – robot manga – a subgenre of shonen

Seinen manga – men’s manga – stories written for an audience of grown men…they address adult concerns but are not necessarily inappropriate for children.

Josei manga — women’s manga intended for a grownup audience…they address adult concerns but are not necessarily inappropriate for children, simply not intended for them.

Seijin manga — means adult stories…seijin manga are those which are only to be sold to adult — they would be considered a subgenre of josei or seinen depending on if their intended audience is female or male

gyakuhāremu – reverse harem, does not necessarily refer to sexual relationships between characters (though it can in which case it would be a subgenre of josei seijin), simply that the main character (in this case a female) is surrounded by numerous male characters who occupy a subordinate role – subgenre of shojo or josei seijin

Yuri manga – means girl love. These stories usually focus on the romantic or emotional aspects of the relationships and are not very explicit…Often the same stories which are considered yuri in Japan are considered yuri hentai in the U.S. – a subgenre of josei seijin

hāremumono – harem manga, does not necessarily refer to sexual relationships between characters (though it can), simply that the main character (a male) is surrounded by numerous female characters who occupy a subordinate role – subgenre of shonen or seinen seijin

Yaoi manga — stories about men who love other men. These stories are written mostly by women for a female audience…these stories usually focus on explicit sex acts more than focusing on character development or romance — they are also considered a subgenre of josei seijin.

Bara — stories generally written by gay men which are intended for a gay male audience — it is a subgenre of seinen seijin

Shonen-ai — romances or love stories between men focused more on the romantic and emotional aspects rather than on explicit descriptions of sex acts — subgenre of Bara

Ecchi – naughty works with sexual undertones – a description which can be applied to any work of manga, including those targeted at that younger audiences

Hentai manga – meaning bizarre or perverse, explicit works depicting sexual themes – subgenre of seijin

Futanari – explicit works depicting hermaphrodic characters – subgenre of seijin

Kemono manga – stories which feature anthropomorphic animals – can be a subset of any genre

Ukiya-e – pictures from the floating world…seems to be the beginnings of manga style artwork, represented the hedonistic lifestyle indulged in in the 17th century by the newly rich.

Please feel free to correct me! Clarify! or add new words that I missed in the comments below!!!

Thanks,

Amy

Manga Terminology Part 1

So here’s the thing that makes any conversation about Manga difficult for me: Manga is a Japanese art form; therefore, the terminology used in an intelligent discussion on the topic includes many words in Japanese…I do not speak or read Japanese. Now that I have begun to understand what the art form is, who reads it, why it’s different from American comics, why it’s different from other kinds of art, and why it’s different from other literature (basically all the things that make Manga a “thing” separate from other things); I must now begin to learn some of the words used to describe the differences within the form itself.

To add to the complexity of this task, Japanese uses a different set of characters from those used in English and there is sometimes not a “one-to-one” translation of syllables from Japanese to English. This requires people who wish to use characters available and recognizable to English speakers to portray Japanese words using a type of transcription called Hepburn Romanization. It used the letters of the English language to portray the sounds one would hear listening to a speaker who is speaking in Japanese. So when the reader “sounds it out” in English, they will (hopefully) pronounce it close to the way it would be pronounced by a speaker of Japanese.

As you can guess, while there are official rules for this system, not everybody who transcribes any thing into English sticks strictly to those uniform rules. This sometimes leads to multiple English spellings for the same word! Also because languages are living creatures, always growing and adapting; sometimes these different transcriptions begin to take on new meanings with a context different from each other! Think of the way authors sometimes indicate a character’s accent in their writing. If they use a Southern accent, what does that say about that character? If they use a Boston accent what does that say? A Mexican accent? Think of how authors portray that accent on the page. They might switch a vowel, add a repetitive vowel, drop letters. Are some of these anomalies I am finding in the transcriptions of Japanese terms meant to portray the same kind of things? Maybe when I find a word spelled with an “a” in place of an “e” it is simply a mistake, but maybe it is intentional to try to convey a context. Or maybe it is another word altogether!!!! Dessert vs desert, through vs though; to a non-native English speaker these words would be awful tricky!

OK that introduction to my terminology list was awfully long so I guess I will make a new post with my list of terms I have (hopefully) learned! Thanks for listening to my dilemma, please feel free to leave me comments with your thoughts, suggestions, or advice!

The Comics Canon

So now let’s get down to the meat and talk about what I actually learned at the MSU Comics Forum. I learned that I know very little about comics!!!

The main thing I took away from this was hit upon by at least two of the speakers from the first panel on “Historical Pathways through Comics”. They demonstrated through their examples that the images used in comics help to explain what words alone could not. It was sort of like the idea that a picture is worth a thousand words! Sean Rogers spoke about bpNichol and how he used the space of his page to convey more than his words alone would have. To paraphrase a quote from Nichol that Mr. Rogers used, Nichol used the visual aspect of language to explain what the language itself could not. The other speaker who touched upon this idea was Brett Sterling in his talk on the trilogy by Jans Harding exploring nothing less than the entire history of the universe. In Harding’s first book “Alpha: Directions” he runs a triple narrative telling the history of the world from the big bang to the emergence of hominids in three different ways simultaneously. This would be impossible to do through words alone (or at least would take up much more space and require much more time and patience on the part of the reader.) He was able to explain the history of the universe through a scientific, religious, and popular culture narrative all at once by including images representing all three ways of understanding nature on the page together; allowing the reader to focus on the overall or on whichever piece was interesting to them at the moment.

While listening to the presenters and listening to the interactions on the sales floor I took lots of notes about things that they mentioned especially the things that it seemed everyone else in the room knew about but of which I had never heard. I divided my list into Manga I may wish to include in my bibliography, books about Manga or anime that I should read while preparing this project, and more general books on comics and comic art which I should ensure my library have on hand for our students.

 

These are the books that everyone else there seemed to have read which I think will be great additions to our collection:

Barrier, J. Michael, ed. A Smithsonian Book of Comic-Book Comics. Washington D.C.: Smithsonian. 1982.

Carlson, George. Yezbick, Daniel, ed. Perfect Nonsense: The Chaotic Comics and Goofy Games of George Carlson. Seattle: Fantagraphics Books. 2013.

Ditko, Steve. The Ditko Collection. Seattle: Fantagraphics Books. 1986.

Harder, Jens. Alpha: Directions. Hamburg: Carlsen. 2010.

Harder, Jens. Beta…civilisations. Hamburg: Carlsen. 2014.

Harder, Jens. Leviathan. Angouleme: Editions de l’An 2. 2003.

Nichol, Bp. Comics. Vancouver: Talonbooks. 1984.

Nichol, Bp. The Martyrology Books 1 & 2. Toronto: The Coach House Press. 1994.

O’Neil, Dennis. The Question, Vol. 1: Zen and Violence. New York: DC Comics. 2007.

Orczy, Emmuska. The Scarlet Pimpernel. New York: Pocket Books. 2004.

 

 

Here are the books that I will be browsing for this project:

Gravett, Paul. Manga: 60 years of Japanese Art. New York: Collins Design. 2004.

Johnson-Woods, Toni. Manga: An Anthology of Global and Cultural Perspectives. New York: Bloomsbury Academic. 2010.

Lehmann, Timothy. Manga Masters of the Art. New York: Collins Design. 2005.

Lent, John A., ed. Illustrating Asia: Comics, Humor Magazines, and Picture Books (Consumasian Book Series). Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. 2001.

Nagaike, Kazumi. Fantasies in Cross-Dressing. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill Academic Publishers. 2012.

Sugiyama, Rika. Comic Artists – Asia: Manga Mahura Manhua. New York: Harper Design. 2004.

 

And this is the beginning of my list of Manga which people spoke highly of and seem to have been important over the years and may make it into my final bibliography: (I haven’t looked into these yet, so they may not be good. Just my preliminary notes!)

Weekly Jump

“Astro Boy” Tezuka

Naruto started in the Aug 1997 issue of Akamaru Jump – one of the best selling manga series of all time

Hokusai Manga – old school Japanese illustration

Osamu Tezuka – father of modern manga

Gundam- bad guys are 3 d

Doraemon – comical

So what’s a “Comics Forum”, anyway?

So, what did I learn at the MSU Comics Forum?! http://www.comicsforum.msu.edu/ Tons of stuff! As someone who was interested in the academic aspects of comics it was a great place to get my feet wet without being too overwhelmed!

They had some items from their collection on display in glass cases in the hallway. As a museum person I was very interested in the cleaver way they had the comics mounted in the cases. They had used a piece of card stock folded into a triangle with one edge thumbtacked to the corkboard and one edge serving as a flat surface for the pulp magazines to stand on. Then they took a strip of clear plastic stretched it out across the face of the magazine and tacked it on either side to prevent them from slipping. This was to me a genius idea, very similar to the “proper” way of creating this kind of display but on a much more realistic budget for most libraries or archives.  (Of course, it did not occur to me to take pictures until we were in the car on the way back home! I always forget about this amazing camera I have in my pocket at all times!!)

The displays were set up to highlight the scope of the comic collect held by the MSU library. They were organized by region or country of origin. This was very helpful for me because it allowed me to get an overview of the breath of the collection while focusing on the Manga which is the objective of this project. There was also a short description of the comics that were selected to represent each country and a short explanation of the history of the comics industry for each place. Some of the cases also held photocopies of pages from books (with their sources properly cited, of course!) which discussed at length important aspects of comics culture.

There were two rooms in which sellers had their wares displayed. While I focused on the exhibit, my coworker went in to explore the offerings and see if there was anything new which we should get for our collection at CCS. Of course he found several comics we did not have and made good deals with the sellers to get them into our collection. This means that he will be doing some original cataloging (one of my secret nerdy favorite things to do!) and what comic artist wouldn’t be excited by the prospect of getting their works cataloged and searchable on WorldCat!? http://www.worldcat.org/

The main reason that we went to this forum was to listen to the panel speakers. I was excited to learn about some of the things that make comics different from other mediums of communication…besides obviously the pictures!! There were five panels scheduled, one each hour between 11am and 5pm. The first panel was a non-show which was actually ok with me because it was the discussion I was least interested in and that gave me time to explore the exhibit and gave Robert time to buy some comics. The middle time slot was an “Artist Spotlight” and that didn’t sound interesting to me either so that is when we took our lunch break.

Also for future reference you can totally go into a residential dining hall at MSU and use a credit card to purchase lunch even if you aren’t a student…I wasn’t sure so I pack a PB&J for lunch just in case!

I am going to break up all I learned over several posts in order to keep them shorter, be more specific, and so I can spread them out better. Besides I only work 4 hour shifts and I’ve got a lot to share! J